Tag Archives: sungeibuloh

Our Weekend “Getaway”: Day 2 of 3 (Sungei Buloh Wetland Reserve, Singapore)

The second day at Sungei Buloh Wetland Reserve was a better day. We arrived later than what we have initially planned but the day went on pretty smooth.

Sadly, we did not manage to witness many shorebirds in action except for one who made an appearance after we photographed the Little Egret.

Little Egret
Shot using Sigma 150-600mm f/5-6.3 DG OS on a Canon 760D.
Aperture: f/6.3
Shutter Speed: 1/1250
ISO: 800
Focal Length: 600mm

I got better with the Sigma 150-600mm lens. I managed to rectify the problem and was elated that my photos turned out sharp and clear.
As mentioned in the previous post, the issue that I have with the Sigma lens was that I am not able to AF on the subject. I will explain the suggested solution that I used to rectify the problem.


Image result for sigma 150-600mm
Top view of a DSLR camera with Sigma 150-600mm lens.
Credits of photo: The-Digital-Picture.com

With reference to the image above, the ring that adjusts the focal length the one that is closer to the body. After you slightly depress the shutter button, the camera will AF on the subject. It may or may not be a sharp focus and to rectify that, simply adjust the focal length after the camera has focus until you get the subject at its sharpest focus before depressing the shutter button fully. (I hope this helps those photographers who face the same issue.)Moving on to the next photo, here is the little shorebird that I mentioned earlier, Common Greenshank.

Common Greenshank
Shot using Sigma 150-600mm f/5-6.3 DG OS on a Canon 760D.
Aperture: f/6.3
Shutter Speed: 1/1250
ISO: 400
Focal Length: 569mm

After slightly more than an hour camping in Hide 1C (one of the observatory huts in the area), we decided to walk around and hoped to see more birds. Luck hit upon us when we arrived at the Main Hut. A group of Milky Storks and Grey Herons were found perched along the river.

In case I have never mentioned it in my blog earlier, the Milky Stork was one of the first few species that I was first encountered last year on my birthday. I was elated when I saw it that day.

Milky Stork & Grey Heron
Shot using Sigma 150-600mm f/5-6.3 DG OS on a Canon 760D.
Aperture: f/6.3
Shutter Speed: 1/800
ISO: 800
Focal Length: 600mm

Look at that drama captured on still. It felt like there’s a story behind this image. The love story between 2 different species (lol!). On another note, I finally managed to get a still shot of the Milky Stork still in flight! That’s an achievement unlocked for me. I am always in awe when I come across photos of other bird enthusiasts that managed to get photos of birds still in flight. And on that day, I achieved it! I think that I can be better at it but for starters, I think it looks great.

We decided to call it a day because we were quite worn out from all the walking and we still have another full day of walking the next morning.

Day 3 was the best day out of the whole weekend in my opinion. From having a good start of the day to the first time encounters and conversations with other photographers, I couldn’t be more excited to share the story. Stay tuned readers. 😀


Our Trip: Sungei Buloh Wetland Reserve.

Last weekend was filled with lots of sound of nature. From the buzzing of the bees to the sweet melody from the birds, I definitely enjoyed every single moment of it. It was tiring, but it’s worth every drop of sweat.

My partner and I started off the long weekend at Sungei Buloh Wetland Reserve which is located at 301 Neo Tiew Crescent. We’ve been there a couple of times but was the first time that I brought my own camera with a newly bought lens; Tamron 70-300mm. I was so excited because it has been a while since I went out to do something that I love. We did further research on the location and tried to explore the variant of species that are found there.

Started the day at 10 am on a Saturday. We were supposed to reach at 7 am to catch the window period when the birds are out but due to unforeseen circumstances, we reached much later. To our surprise, we managed to spot quite a number of species roaming around the park. In fact, we encountered more than what we anticipated.

We made our way to the Little Heron Deck and that was where we saw this beautiful Dark Glassy Tiger. This butterfly, also known as Parantica agleoides, is commonly found in Sungei Buloh Wetlands Reserves and Pasir Ris Park.

The Dark Glassy Tiger can be identified by the presence of the longitudinal streaks in the forewing cell, in contrast to the transverse streaks for the Blue Glassy Tiger.

While on the deck, I managed to spot a Yellow-vented Bulbul, flying from branch to branch around the area. It was pretty hard to get a shot of this lively bird. After a few attempts, here is the final product:

Apart from it’s ‘bubbling’ call, the Yellow-vented  Bulbul is known to have taken very well toward modernization.

And of course, for those who have been to Sungei Buloh, will know of the famous Estuarine crocodiles that reside in the river:

Also known as the Saltwater Crocodile, this creature can grow up to 8 metres long!

The crocodile is not the only reptile that we encountered that day.


The Changeable Lizards are commonly found in mangroves and coastal vegetations.

We spent almost 7 hours there and decided to call it a day. Overall, we were not that satisfied as we know that they are more species to be found at Sungei Buloh but we were happy that we were able to get pretty decent shots for our collection of photographs.

To end this post, here is a couple of Zebra Doves, which is commonly mistaken for its cousin, Peaceful Dove (commonly found in Australia):

Milky Stork


On one of my birthday weekends, my partner decided to bring me to a place that he knows I will enjoy, which is one of the nature reserves in Singapore; Sungei Buloh. I love the nature as much as I love the city life. As he is an avid bird watcher, he educates me about the different species of birds in Singapore and also mentioned a few that are migratory birds.

This is the very first still of a bird that I’ve snapped. We literally spent quite a while to capture this beautiful still.